Of Coarse It Is

I’ve posted this picture before, but it’s just so funny, and such an accurate representation of this area (unfortunately) that I wanted to post it again.

Several of my 8th graders called the mayor’s office to tell someone, anyone, there that the sign contained a gross misspelling that would make us as a community look bad in the eyes of any visitors, and as this golf coarse is an excellent one which attracts golfers from all over the world, it was definitely going to be seen.  I don’t know how many hundreds of people saw this sign and assumed, rightfully, that we here just didn’t know no better, but even one would have been humiliating.

The mayor’s office did not treat my students kindly, either.  My kids were told, repeatedly, that the sign was correct; all the spelling had been checked and double-checked by the “spellchecker,’ and every word on the sign was spelled right.

This was, of course, very true.  Spellcheckers know their business.  Their business, to the later chagrin of many trusting people, is SPELLING, not context, and if you’ve used a word that is a genuine word, “spellchecker” will deem it correct.  That’s write, rite?  I tell my students that spellchecker is a fickle lover.  It does not love you, and will laugh at you even as it assures you that your word choice is valid when it is, in fact, knot.

After about a month, the city was finally persuaded to remove this sign and replace it with a corrected version.  I’m sure the person at the mayor’s office who treated my students so shabbily is still sitting there shaking her head and sending memos that wail, “Their wasn’t nothing wrong with that word.”

“Adjudged” was spelled correctly on this sign, too, but I don’t think anybody looked up its actual meaning in any dictionary.  And while the corrected sign now spells “course” correctly, it still has the word “adjudged” on it.  I wonder which court of law so proclaimed this golf course the best in Indiana?

I live just down the road from this country club.  I first saw the misspelled sign as I turned onto the road late at night; my headlights swept the sign and I saw the writing on it and assumed I was just tired.  The next day, I saw it again and realized that it was a genuine blooper of mindblowing intensity.  My husband got the camera and took several pictures.  During the course of the next couple of weeks, there were people parked by the sign every day, taking pictures and videos.  This was also the time frame wherein my students were calling the mayor’s office about the spelling error.

But, as I said, the sign has been corrected, except for the word “adjudged.”  And I’m probably the only person in the county who is bothered by it.

The language arts are not a priority here.  Make a mistake with a basketball statistic, though, and all HELL will bust plumb loose.


Comments

Of Coarse It Is — 10 Comments

  1. Pingback: Sunday Linky Love | The Bean Blog

  2. Pingback: Sunday Linky Love | The Bean Blog

  3. We have a quaint little thing here in Oregon where a guy can get himself elected “county judge” even though he doesn’t know what res ips loquitor is. Or even where the law school is. Maybe in 2050 we’ll get “adjudged” correctly.

  4. We have a quaint little thing here in Oregon where a guy can get himself elected “county judge” even though he doesn’t know what res ips loquitor is. Or even where the law school is. Maybe in 2050 we’ll get “adjudged” correctly.

  5. As someone who grew up elsewhere in the state, let me assure you that there are many, many places in Indiana where this kind of thing goes unnoticed and unchanged. After all, most of Indiana is not situated near a major university where people learn to care about these things. Granted, they’re not usually written in stone, but still!

    Once when I was in a high school business law class, the teacher was writing some notes on the board and left out an “l” in the word public. NO ONE (save for the pervert in the back row…ME!) even noticed! I was too shy to say anything, but I was mortified for everyone in the class. Eventually, the teacher read back over her notes and recognized the error. She glanced nervously around to see if anyone else had caught it and saw me turning purple. We exchanged a nod and I saw her sigh with relief that I wasn’t going to comment out loud.

  6. As someone who grew up elsewhere in the state, let me assure you that there are many, many places in Indiana where this kind of thing goes unnoticed and unchanged. After all, most of Indiana is not situated near a major university where people learn to care about these things. Granted, they’re not usually written in stone, but still!

    Once when I was in a high school business law class, the teacher was writing some notes on the board and left out an “l” in the word public. NO ONE (save for the pervert in the back row…ME!) even noticed! I was too shy to say anything, but I was mortified for everyone in the class. Eventually, the teacher read back over her notes and recognized the error. She glanced nervously around to see if anyone else had caught it and saw me turning purple. We exchanged a nod and I saw her sigh with relief that I wasn’t going to comment out loud.

  7. I hope you don’t mind that I am going to “borrow” this pic, with proper documentation of source, of course. I teach high school English and I am trying to compile enough of these types of public displays to make a power point for entertainment’s sake in the classroom, although I will disguise it to have an important educational purpose.

    My personal favorite was when exorcism was one of the vocabulary words for my 9th grade English class. It was at the same time that “The Exercism of Emily Rose” was at the theatre, at least that’s what the marque at our small local theatre proclaimed. I actually let students use the classroom phone to call and leave a message on the movie theatre’s answering machine about the mispelling.

  8. I hope you don’t mind that I am going to “borrow” this pic, with proper documentation of source, of course. I teach high school English and I am trying to compile enough of these types of public displays to make a power point for entertainment’s sake in the classroom, although I will disguise it to have an important educational purpose.

    My personal favorite was when exorcism was one of the vocabulary words for my 9th grade English class. It was at the same time that “The Exercism of Emily Rose” was at the theatre, at least that’s what the marque at our small local theatre proclaimed. I actually let students use the classroom phone to call and leave a message on the movie theatre’s answering machine about the mispelling.

  9. Oh, fercryinoutloud! That would be my pet project; I would hound and harass them until the fixed the frickin’ sign (at which point, I’m sure, they’d sic the city assessor on me and raise my taxes, but it just might be worth it).

    Oh, and by the way, your site is still locking up on me – it took me three tries to leave this comment….

  10. Oh, fercryinoutloud! That would be my pet project; I would hound and harass them until the fixed the frickin’ sign (at which point, I’m sure, they’d sic the city assessor on me and raise my taxes, but it just might be worth it).

    Oh, and by the way, your site is still locking up on me – it took me three tries to leave this comment….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.